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“When we are dreaming alone it is only a dream. When we are dreaming together it is the beginning of reality.”Helder Camara

Angel Oak Tree, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Photo: pinterest.com

"Father Forgive": These two words which I discovered at the ruins of Coventry Cathedral in 1973 changed the course of my life.

Photo: Anne Mofid

This is the story, “My Coventry Story”

Prof. Kamran Mofid

ST MICHAEL'S HOUSE, Coventry Cathedral,

11 PRIORY ROW      CV1 5EX

7.00pm Wednesday 26 July 2017

My Story is My Witness: A Story of Hope,  Suffering and Hope again

(With special thanks and gratitude to Revd Canon Dr. Sarah Hills, Coventry Cathedral’s Canon for Reconciliation Ministry, for her kind invitation. I also thank the Reconciliation Ministry Team at St. Michael’s House for their support.)

Prof. Mofid and Canon Hills, St. Michael's House, Coventry Cathedral, 26 July 2017

Photo: Anne Mofid

'...In short, looking back, I believe one experience of that day, has had a major impact on me. That was when Annie (my future wife) and I were at the ruins of the old cathedral. I saw the ruined altar, with a charred cross, a replica of the original, it's burnt blackness in startling contrast to the clean polished wood of most church crosses I had seen in Oxford or London. Then on the wall behind the altar, I noticed two words that had been carved into the red sandstone, their letters a foot high: FATHER, FORGIVE.

I asked Annie: “Who is the Father?” and “Forgive who?” She tried to the best of her ability to answer me. But, I am sure she knew that I was not getting it:

Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit, All in one! Forgiving the Germans, who had just destroyed the cathedral and the city! Wow! What next?!